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Prime Mover Magazine


X-Way on the Highway

X-Way on the Highway

With the launch of its new Stralis X-Way, IVECO has set its sights on a larger piece of the heavy-duty rigid and single-trailer prime mover pie. Prime Mover spoke with Emiliano Foieri, IVECO’s local Product Manager – Heavy, to find out more about the truck and its development.

The original Stralis was launched to much fanfare in Australia some 15 years ago. Since then, and with a number of upgrades, it has achieved moderate sales success but somehow never quite reached the potential for which its maker had intended.

Keen to remedy the situation, IVECO has introduced the Stralis X-Way Euro 6. As the title suggests, this truck is something of a cross-over prime mover, with beefy specifications that see it slotting neatly between the existing Stralis AS-L Euro 5 and the off-road Trakker range.

IVECO describes it as suitable for light off-road missions.

The X-Way range comprises the 6x4 AD/AT and 6x4 AS prime movers as well as 6x4 AD/AT, 8x4 AD/AT and 8x4 AS rigids.

The prime movers feature gross vehicle masses (GVM) of 25 tonnes and gross combination masses (GCM) of 45 tonnes while the rigids range between 25 and 30 tonnes GVM and 40 to 45 tonnes GCM.

Higher GCMs are available across all models on application.

All prime mover models are equipped with rear 8-bag Electronically Controlled Air Suspension (ECAS) and front parabolic leaf springs.

Rigid variants use the same rear suspension plus there’s front ECAS suspension on the 8x4 models. Mechanical rear suspension with standard front parabolic springs is an option on the 6x4 AD/AT versions.

Cab options include ‘Day’ (AD), ‘Sleeper’ (AT) and ‘High Roof Sleeper’ (AS) for prime mover and rigid models while wheelbase options are 3,900 and 4,200mm for prime movers and 5,720, 5,800, 6,300 and 6,500mm for rigids.

The range has three distinct engines – Cursor 9, 11 and 13. Each features a 2200 bar (31,900psi) multiple injection per cycle common-rail fuel system along with re-profiled pistons and new rings said to lower tangential load to reduce friction without increasing engine oil consumption.

The engines meet the stringent Euro 6 measure through the use of IVECO’s Hi-eSCR (selective catalytic reduction) system featuring a passive DPF (diesel particulate filter).


IVECO claims key benefits of Hi-eSCR include: no combustion by-products back into the cylinders; no additional cooling requirements; long intervals between DPF regeneration events, more power and torque density and lower specific fuel consumption (g/kWh).

The new engine range begins with the Cursor 9, an 8.7 litre unit developing 360hp between 1,600 and 2,200rpm and 1,650Nm of torque between 1,200 and 1,530 rpm.

In regard to the Cursor 11, an 11.1 litre engine, it develops 460hp between 1,500 and 1,900rpm and 2,150Nm of torque from an extremely low 925 to 1,500 rpm.

The Cursor 13, a 12.9 litre unit produces 510hp between 1,600 and 1,900rpm and 2,300Nm of torque from a low 900 to 1,525 rpm.

Emiliano Foieri, IVECO Australia and New Zealand Heavy Product Manager joined Fiat Powertrain in early 2004 after graduating from university with an electrical engineering degree.

A few years later he transferred to IVECO and was charged with a Product Support role for all IVECO vehicles sold into Africa and the Middle East.

In 2013 he moved to Australia and took up a Product Support role with IVECO, a position he held for nearly three years before being promoted to his current role.
    
When Prime Mover spoke with him, Emiliano was keen to elaborate on the circumstances surrounding the development and testing of the X-Way specifically for harsh Australian operating environments and how it differs from previous Stralis iterations.

“Clearly the Australian X-Way, assembled in Dandenong (Vic), is the brother of the global product produced in Madrid that was launched in Europe in late 2017,” Emiliano says.

“After local testing of IVECO Euro 6 products prior to the X-Way launch, the recommendations of the Engineering Departments in Dandenong and Europe, as well as the axle and transmission suppliers, was that the X-Way needed to include the most robust components available.

“Therefore, it was specified with a higher capacity cooling package, stronger transmission and axles and a bigger catalytic muffler compared to European equivalents. It also features 7.7mm thick chassis rails compared to the 6.7mm rails on the standard Stralis.”

Another change, Emiliano says, is that unlike previous Stralis variants where the cab came from Europe fully trimmed and furnished, the X-Way cab is imported as a bare shell with the dash and trim installed at Dandenong.

“For the first time now we are building the cab from scratch and that means we are learning how to assemble the components and make necessary changes to adapt them to suit Australian road conditions, which I know are much harsher than in Europe. I believe this will improve our quality control and customer satisfaction in this vital area,” he says.

This is a critical point and, provided IVECO gets it right, one that could result in markedly increased sales of the X-Way compared to previous Stralis offerings. Put plainly, there’s nothing drivers detest more than an incessant rattle from the dash while driving.

“The X-Way development has seen the greatest collaboration between the engineering departments in Australia and Europe in the history of Iveco,” Emiliano adds.

“We have included all the safety systems available in the European X-Way in the Australian models and believe we have a package that will eminently suit Australian operators.”

In sum, if IVECO can eliminate niggly issues with dash integrity such as those that plagued previous Stralis units then X-Way should have a bright future in the Australian market.

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