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Prime Mover Magazine


Scania VP discusses new XT series and future plans

Scania Group has earmarked 2025 as a likely date for total cost of ownership parity between diesel and electric powered heavy vehicles according to Claes Erixon Scania Executive Vice President Research & Development.

In Melbourne for the launch of its XT mining and construction series at IMARC 2018, Erixon said it was unlikely its customers would pay higher prices for less payload until a convergence in total cost of ownership occurred causing the next shift in the market.

Fuel range still remained a crucial indicator of development.

“Today it doesn’t make sense to add more batteries to the truck because of weight and also cost,” he said.

“It’s a new area for us. We are 127 years with combustion engines and we’re quite good at it. It’s a new type of competence that we’re really trying to build up quickly during the last 10 years in this new field with different kind of suppliers and cooperation.”

It was also announced that both hybrid and ethanol running trucks were currently being trialled in local conditions by Scania in right hand drive.

“The hybrid truck is perfect for those who want to have the range and then want to run zero emission and the last mile for the customer. Of course it saves fuel. In a lot of city applications we see a lot of start and stop.”

At the recent IAA Commercial Vehicles Show in Hanover, Germany, Scania doubled down with its imprint for leading the way to reach a zero carbon emissions by 2050.

“We are committed to sustainability and we want a real change when it comes to the world of transport. The way to do that is of course to talk about the future but to talk about the here and now. What can we do today to make changes? That is what we showed at IAA.”

Erixon said Scania had the widest offering in the commercial vehicle industry for renewable fuels. The portfolio currently included biodiesel, HVO, LNG, ethanol, biogas and a recently launched plug-in hybrid.

Net sales across the global market for Scania increased by 11 per cent globally according to a Q3 report released overnight.

Total truck deliveries were on the rise by 9 per cent to 20,004 during the third quarter of 2018.

Order bookings for trucks fell by 7 per cent during the first nine months of 2018 compared to the previous year.

Disruptions in the supply chain related to the shift to the new truck range were aggravated by the strike at Scania’s component supplier that resulted in a temporary stop in deliveries and sales of Scania V8 engines.

Mining and construction remained a valued sector for the company’s research and development and multi-configurable product offerings globally.

Erixon said the business invested resources and effort in R&D together with production colleagues to ensure its trucks were configurable for very specific occasions.

“I prefer that the customer describes the specification and we design the truck to meet that specification. From my point of view I would like our customers in Australia planning ahead so they can get exactly what they want even though it takes more weeks,” he said.

He added, the XT series had been received extraordinarily well with great reception from drivers.

“It’s always nice to see that it has been perceived in the way that it is supposed to be.”

“At Scania we don’t talk much about models, we talk about variance so you can combine the cab size, or any engine or axle configuration that you want. On all of these combinations you can add the XT.”

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